Review Marathi

Khichik review: Decent premise let down by amateurish writing

Release Date: 20 Sep 2019 / Rated: U/A


Cinestaan Rating

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Suyog Zore

The film, written and directed by Preetam SK Patil, is a prime example of why not every realistic film is a good film.

Khichik is a story of Aaba (Anil Dhakate) and his grandson Phatphati (Yash Khond). Their community lives on the outskirts of a small village. Aaba dotes on Phatphati and to fulfil his wish decides to take him to Pune. For this he enlists the help of Mithun (Siddharth Jadhav) whose motivation for helping the duo is dubious, to say the least.

The first half of the film takes place mostly in the village and features some forced comic scenes none of which tickle you. Though writer-director Preetam SK Patil has tried to keep the affair realistic, in doing so he has made an extremely boring film.

The second half shows you what happens when they finally arrive in Pune. The film changes its tone here and becomes melodramatic. There are a few more forced comic interludes thanks to Prathamesh Parab, but the second half more or less remains just as dull and boring as the first, forcing you to glance at your wristwatch every few minutes. To make matters worse, this half also features an unnecessary and illogical subplot dealing with Parab's character.

Khichik's biggest flaw is its amateurish writing. You never understand what the writer is trying to convey. Though both halves are painfully slow, at least the novelty of the dialogues because of the distinct dialect keeps your interest afloat for some time in the first; that novelty, too, wears off once the story shifts to Pune.

Thankfully. while the acting from all the members of the cast is not as bad as some of the other aspects of the film, it still leaves a lot to be desired. Except for Anil Dhakate, everyone is strictly average. Dhakate manages to tug at your heartstrings on a few occasions with just his expressions. Yash Khond has also put in a decent performance. Both Siddharth Jadhav and Prathamesh Parab overact at times. To add to the viewer's misery, their obviously fake getup distracts you every time they appear on screen.

One is best advised to avoid this mess.

 

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