News Hindi

Not mandatory to play national anthem before film screening, rules Supreme Court


The court has left it on the theatre owners to decide if they want to continue with the practise. However, if the theatre play the anthem, the audience will be required to stand up in respect.

Our Correspondent

It is no longer mandatory to play the national anthem before a film, the Supreme Court ruled today. The decision arrives a day after the central government approached the court with an affidavit to stay its earlier order that demanded all the theatres play the anthem before every screening and the audiences to stand up while it plays.

The Centre, on 8 January 2018, approached the court with an affidavit informing it about an inter-ministerial committee to frame new guidelines to outline circumstances and locations where the anthem should be played. The committee is expected to arrive with its own recommendations in six months. 

The government had stated that the court may consider the restoration of "status quo ante until then i.e. restoration of the position as it stood before the order passed by this court on November 30, 2016."

Following the same, the Supreme Court has now directed that it is not mandatory to play the national anthem before every screening at cinema halls and has left it on the theatre owners to decide if they want to continue with the practise. However, if the theatre play the anthem, the audience will be required to stand up in respect. It further directed the inter-ministerial committee to take a comprehensive decision on the legal changes required in order to pass an executive decision.