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Trailer of Kaushik Ganguly's Bijoya is like a fast forward narration of the entire story


The director could have avoided disclosing the emotional turmoil of the protagonists as it probably forms the core of the film.

Roushni Sarkar

The official trailer of Kaushik Ganguly’s upcoming film Bijoya is out and it offers an intriguing glimpses into the characters’ journey from its prequel Bisorjon (2018), which won the National award for Best Feature Film in Bengali.

The trailer of Bijoya begins with the parting scene of Padma (Jaya Ahsan) and Nasir Ali (Abir Chatterjee) from Bisorjon and a haunting look of Padma’s lonely house in Bangladesh with a child reciting a poem in the background. Padma’s present husband Ganesh Mondal (Kaushik Ganguly) wishes to take his son to India and when they land in Kolkata, Mondal is admiring the city. Next, Padma is heard saying that one pays all the debts in a single lifetime and Nasir Ali enters the scene.

The accompanying folk song by Dohar suggests a reunion of Padma and Nasir in India. While Nasir expresses his surprise on meeting Padma in his home city, Mondal is insecure at the thought of their proximity. A heartfelt and transparent discussion about the feelings and equations of the three follows. The director (Kaushik Ganguly) could have avoided disclosing the emotional turmoil of the protagonists as that probably forms the core of the film.

It is then disclosed that Mondal suffers from a disease and from the way he asks Nasir to take care of Padma, it is clear he does not have much time left. The three characters seem to be in an emotional fix, while some opportunists seem to take advantage of their simplicity and different religions.

The trailer looks like a fast forward narration of the entire story, with the director hardly saving any suspense for the film. There are a few interesting dialogues of Ganesh Mondal and the background score gels well with the earthy sentiments of the film.

The audience will need to wait until 4 January to see whether the film lives up to the standard of its prequel and takes the love story beyond the geo-political discrimination.