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Mani Ratnam's Chekka Chivantha Vaanam trailer gives away the plot


The first trailer of the director's much-awaited multi-starrer was released on Saturday by music director AR Rahman, much to the delight of fans and film buffs.

Manigandan KR

The first trailer of director Mani Ratnam's much-awaited multi-starrer, Chekka Chivantha Vaanam, was released today by the film's music director AR Rahman, much to the delight of fans and film buffs.

Madras Talkies, Mani Ratnam's production house, also released both the Tamil and Telugu trailers of the film on Twitter.

While the Tamil version is called Chekka Chivantha Vaanam, the Telugu version is called Nawab.

Almost immediately after the Telugu trailer was put out, actor Nagarjuna tweeted, "The man who gave me Geetanjali! Manirathnam weaves his magic again."

If one goes by what is shown in the trailer, Senapathi/Bhupathi Reddy (Prakash Raj) is a big shot, a businessman, real-estate tycoon, kingmaker, mafia don and Robin Hood. Senapathi/Bhupathi has three sons, the eldest of whom is Varadan/Varada (Arvind Swamy). Varadan believes he is the one who will take over the empire after his father's death. Varadan believes his brothers won't get into the family business because they are both educated, unlike him.

The second son Thyagu (Arun Vijay) has two sides to him. One is a loving, caring side which is visible to many. However, there is another side that not many know of. He secretly nurtures a desire to succeed his dad.

The third son is Ethi/Rudra (Simbu), who feels he is the family's neglected son. He, too, wants to become a king and rule with his friends.

The fourth important character in the film is Rasool (Vijay Sethupathi), a disgraced former policeman. He joins the brothers in the hope that one day he will get the chance to occupy Varadan's chair. The succession battle that ensues is what the film is all about.

Watch the Tamil and Telugu trailers below and tell us if you will be watching this film in the theatres.

 

 

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